Drugs A - Z

Glimepiride Oral tablet

Treatment is combined with diet and exercise

Generic Name: glimepiride  |  Brand Name: Amaryl

Brand Names: Amaryl

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

Special Alerts:

[UPDATED 02/04/2011] FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that information on the cardiovascular risks (including heart attack) of rosiglitazone has been added to the physician labeling and patient Medication Guide. This information was first announced by FDA on September 23, 2010 as part of new restrictions for prescribing and use of this drug.

Rosiglitazone is sold as a single-ingredient product under the brand name Avandia. Rosiglitazone is also sold as a combination product under the brand name Avandamet (contains rosiglitazone and metformin) and under the brand name Avandaryl (contains rosiglitazone and glimepiride).

In addition to describing the cardiovascular risks, the drug labels have been revised to state that rosiglitazone and rosiglitazone-containing medicines should only be used:

  • In patients already being treated with these medicines
  • In patients whose blood sugar cannot be controlled with other anti-diabetic medicines and who, after consulting with their healthcare professional, do not wish to use pioglitazone-containing medicines (Actos, Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR, or Duetact).
For more information visit the FDA website at: [Web] and [Web].

[Posted 09/23/2010] ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that it will significantly restrict the use of the diabetes drug rosiglitazone (Avandia) to patients with Type 2 diabetes who cannot control their diabetes on other medications. These new restrictions are in response to data that suggest an elevated risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients treated with rosiglitazone

BACKGROUND: Rosiglitazone is in a class of drugs known as thiazolidinediones, or TZDs. It is intended to be used in conjunction with diet and exercise to improve glucose (blood sugar) control in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Rosiglitazone also is available in combination with other diabetes medications, metformin under the brand name Avandamet or glimepiride under the brand name Avandaryl.

RECOMMENDATION: FDA will require that GSK develop a restricted access program for rosiglitazone under a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy, or REMS. Under the REMS, rosiglitazone will be available to new patients only if they are unable to achieve glucose control on other medications and are unable to take pioglitazone (Actos), the only other drug in this class. Current users of rosiglitazone who are benefiting from the drug will be able to continue using the medication if they choose to do so.

Doctors will have to attest to and document their patients' eligibility; patients will have to review statements describing the cardiovascular safety concerns associated with this drug and acknowledge they understand the risks. The agency anticipates that the REMS will limit use of rosiglitazone significantly. For more information visit the FDA website at: [Web] and [Web].

What is this medicine?

GLIMEPIRIDE (GLYE me pye ride) helps to treat type 2 diabetes. Treatment is combined with diet and exercise. This medicine helps your body use insulin better.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • diabetic ketoacidosis
  • glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency
  • heart disease
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • severe infection or injury
  • thyroid disease
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to glimepiride, sulfa drugs, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnancy or recent attempts to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Swallow with a drink of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take your dose at the same time each day, with breakfast or your first large meal. Do not take more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Elderly patients over 65 years old can have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • bosentan
  • chloramphenicol
  • cisapride
  • clarithromycin
  • medicines for fungal or yeast infections
  • metoclopramide
  • probenecid
  • warfarin

Many medications may cause an increase or decrease in blood sugar, these include:

  • alcohol containing beverages
  • aspirin and aspirin-like drugs
  • chloramphenicol
  • chromium
  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills
  • fluoxetine
  • heart medicines like disopyramide
  • isoniazid
  • male hormones or anabolic steroids
  • medicines called MAO Inhibitors like Nardil, Parnate, Marplan, Eldepryl
  • medicines for allergies, asthma, cold, or cough
  • medicines for mental problems
  • medicines for weight loss
  • niacin
  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen
  • pentamidine
  • phenytoin
  • probenecid
  • quinolone antibiotics like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ofloxacin
  • some herbal dietary supplements
  • steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone
  • thyroid medicine
  • water pills or diuretics

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Tell your doctor or health care professional if your blood sugar is high, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. Do not skip meals. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, eat or drink something containing sugar at once and contact your doctor or health care professional. Make sure family members know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, like seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once.

This medicine can make you more sensitive to the sun. Keep out of the sun. If you cannot avoid being in the sun, wear protective clothing and use sunscreen. Do not use sun lamps or tanning beds/booths.

Wear a medical identification bracelet or chain to say you have diabetes, and carry a card that lists all your medications.


Last Updated: September 03, 2009
Licensed from
The Healthline Site, its content, such as text, graphics, images, search results, HealthMaps, Trust Marks, and other material contained on the Healthline Site ("Content"), its services, and any information or material posted on the Healthline Site by third parties are provided for informational purposes only. None of the foregoing is a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on the Healthline Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Please read the Terms of Service for more information regarding use of the Healthline Site.
Advertisement
Advertisement