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Enoxaparin Sodium (Porcine) Solution for injection

It is used after knee, hip, or abdominal surgeries to prevent blood clotting

Generic Name: enoxaparin  |  Brand Name: Clexane

Brand Names: Clexane, Lovenox

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

    Spinal/Epidural Hematoma Risk
  • Epidural or spinal hematomas and neurologic injury, including long-term or permanent paralysis, associated with concurrent use of low molecular weight heparins or heparinoids and neuraxial (spinal/epidural) anesthesia or spinal puncture.
  • Risk increased by use of indwelling epidural catheters for administration of analgesia or by concomitant use of drugs affecting hemostasis (e.g., NSAIAs, platelet inhibitors, other anticoagulants).
  • Risk also increased by traumatic or repeated epidural or spinal puncture.
  • Monitor frequently for signs and symptoms of neurological impairment and treat urgently if neurologic compromise noted.
  • Consider potential benefits versus risks of spinal or epidural anesthesia or spinal puncture in patients receiving or being considered for thromboprophylaxis with anticoagulants. (See Hematologic Effects and see Neurologic Effects under Cautions.)

What is this medicine?

ENOXAPARIN (ee nox a PA rin) is used after knee, hip, or abdominal surgeries to prevent blood clotting. It is also used to treat existing blood clots in the lungs or in the veins.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • bleeding disorders, hemorrhage, or hemophilia
  • infection of the heart or heart valves
  • kidney or liver disease
  • previous stroke
  • prosthetic heart valve
  • recent surgery or delivery of a baby
  • ulcer in the stomach or intestine, diverticulitis, or other bowel disease
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to enoxaparin, heparin, pork or pork products, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection under the skin. It is usually given by a health-care professional. You or a family member may be trained on how to give the injections. If you are to give yourself injections, make sure you understand how to use the syringe, measure the dose if necessary, and give the injection. To avoid bruising, do not rub the site where this medicine has been injected. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on the advice of your doctor or health care professional.

Make sure you receive a puncture-resistant container to dispose of the needles and syringes once you have finished with them. Do not reuse these items. Return the container to your doctor or health care professional for proper disposal.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

-aspirin and aspirin-like medicines
-heparin
-mifepristone
-palifermin
-warfarin
This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

-cilostazol
-clopidogrel
-dipyridamole
-NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen
-sulfinpyrazone
-ticlopidine

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. Your condition will be monitored carefully while you are receiving this medicine. Contact your doctor or health care professional and seek emergency treatment if you develop increased difficulty in breathing, chest pain, dizziness, shortness of breath, swelling in the legs or arms, abdominal pain, decreased vision, pain when walking, or pain and warmth of the arms or legs. These can be signs that your condition has gotten worse.

Monitor your skin closely for easy bruising or red spots, which can be signs of bleeding. If you notice easy bruising or minor bleeding from the nose, gums/teeth, in your urine, or stool, contact your doctor or health care professional right away. The dose of your medicine may need to be changed.

If you are going to have surgery, tell your doctor or health care professional that you are taking this medicine.

Try to avoid injury while you are using this medicine. Be careful when brushing or flossing your teeth, shaving, cutting your fingernails or toenails, or when using sharp objects. Report any injuries to your doctor or health care professional.


Last Updated: June 06, 2013
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