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Cyclosporine Oral solution

It is used to decrease the immune system's response to a transplanted organ

Generic Name: cycloSPORINE  |  Brand Name: Sandimmune

Brand Names: Sandimmune, Gengraf, Sangcya, Neoral

There is an FDA Alert for this drug. Click here to view it.

What is this medicine?

CYCLOSPORINE (SYE kloe spor een) is used to decrease the immune system's response to a transplanted organ. The medicine (Neoral only) is also used for rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
  • cancer
  • high blood pressure
  • immune system problems
  • infection
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • previous coal tar, PUVA, ultraviolet, or radiation therapy
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to cyclosporine, alcohol, corn oil (Neoral only), castor oil (Neoral only), other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Use the dosing syringe provided to measure your dose. For the Sandimmune brand, mix your dose in milk, chocolate milk, or orange juice (at room temperature). If you are taking any other brand of cyclosporine, mix the measured dose in a glass of orange or apple juice that is at room temperature. Do not use grapefruit juice or milk. Mix in a glass container (not plastic) and stir well just before taking. Rinse the glass with more liquid and swallow to make sure you get all the dose. Try to mix with the same diluent for each dose. This will help you keep a constant amount of cyclosporine in your body. After use, dry the outside of the dosing syringe with a clean towel. Do not rinse with water or any other cleaning agent. The dosing syringe must be dry before use. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Take it at the same time each day and at the same time in relation to meals. Do not take it more often than directed. Do not stop taking except on your doctor's advice.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 1 year for selected conditions (Neoral) and for children as young as 6 months for selected conditions (Sandimmune), precautions do apply.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses. Call your doctor or health care professional if you miss more than one dose or if you miss doses on a regular basis.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:
  • bosentan
  • cidofovir
  • cisapride
  • mibefradil
  • ranolazine
  • red yeast rice, monascus purpureus
  • St. John's wort
  • tacrolimus

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • acyclovir
  • allopurinol
  • amiloride
  • amiodarone
  • antibiotics like ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, vancomycin, trimethoprim; sulfamethoxazole, nafcillin, rifampin, rifabutin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, and quinupristin; dalfopristin
  • bromocriptine
  • carbamazepine
  • cimetidine
  • colchicine
  • danazol
  • digoxin
  • female hormones, including contraceptive or birth control pills
  • imatinib
  • medicines for fungal infections like amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, terbinafine, and ketoconazole
  • medicines for blood pressure like diltiazem, nicardipine, verapamil, enalapril, ramipril, and losartan
  • medicines for cholesterol like lovastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, and fenofibrate
  • medicines for HIV infection like indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, and saquinavir
  • medicines that suppress the immune system
  • melphalan
  • methotrexate
  • metoclopramide
  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen
  • octreotide
  • orlistat
  • oxcarbazepine
  • phenobarbital
  • phenytoin
  • ranitidine
  • sirolimus
  • spironolactone
  • steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone
  • sulfinpyrazone
  • ticlopidine
  • triamterene
  • vaccines
  • voriconazole


Last Updated: March 02, 2009
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