Advertisement

Generic Name:

sodium-hyaluronate, Injectable solution

Generic Name:
Euflexxa,Hyalgan,Orthovisc,Supartz,Amvisc,GELSYN-3,Monovisc,Provisc,Supartz FX

sodium-hyaluronate, Injectable solution

All Brands

  • Euflexxa
  • Hyalgan
  • Orthovisc
  • Supartz
  • Amvisc
  • GELSYN-3
  • Monovisc
  • Provisc
  • Supartz FX
SECTION 1 of 4

Highlights for sodium-hyaluronate

Injectable solution
1

Hyaluronate is an injected treatment used to treat knee pain due to osteoarthritis. It’s given by your healthcare provider.

2

Common side effects include pain and stiffness in the knee, injection site reactions, back pain, headache, and upset stomach.

3

Avoid strenuous or prolonged physical activity for 48 hours after your hyaluronate injection. Don’t jog, play sports, lift heavy objects, or stand for more than an hour at a time.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Allergic reaction warning

This drug comes with an increased risk of an allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

  • hives
  • itching
  • red, swollen skin
  • tightness in your chest
  • trouble breathing
  • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • sudden drop in blood pressure. Symptoms may include dizziness, feeling faint, and trouble breathing.

Knee joint infection

This medication increases your risk of knee joint infections due to the injection procedure. In some cases, this can lead to a serious infection called septic arthritis. This condition can spread through your bloodstream and can be dangerous if not treated. Symptoms may include:

  • fever
  • being unable to move your knee
  • severe pain in your knee, especially when you try to move it
  • knee swelling
  • knee redness

What is hyaluronate?

This drug is a prescription medication that’s injected in your knee. It’s only give by a healthcare provider in a clinical setting.

Why it's used

This drug is used to relieve knee pain due to osteoarthritis. It’s used in people who don’t get enough relief from over-the-counter pain medicines or from exercise and physical therapy.

How it works

Hyaluronate is a gel-like, elastic substance found in your joints that is needed for them to work properly.

More Details

How it works

Hyaluronate is a gel-like, elastic substance found in your joints that is needed for them to work properly. Your body’s hyaluronate acts like a lubricant and a shock absorber for your joints. People with arthritis might not have enough of it in their joints. When hyaluronate is injected into your knee, it restores the hyaluronate in your knee joint.

Advertisement
SECTION 2 of 4

sodium-hyaluronate Side Effects

Injectable solution

Most Common Side Effects

The most common side effects that occur with hyaluronate include: 

  • pain and stiffness in your knee or at the injection site

  • swelling, redness, or warmth in or around your knee

  • bruising or redness at the injection site

  • back pain

  • headache

  • stomach ache

Serious Side Effects

If you experience any of these serious side effects, call your doctor right away. If your symptoms are potentially life threatening, or if you think you’re experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

  • allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

    • hives
    • itching
    • red, swollen skin
    • tightness in your chest
    • trouble breathing
    • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat
    • sudden drop in blood pressure. Symptoms may include dizziness, feeling faint, and trouble breathing.
  • knee joint infection. Symptoms may include:

    • fever
    • being unable to move your knee
    • severe pain in your knee, especially when you try to move it
    • knee swelling
    • knee redness
Pharmacist's Advice
Clinical Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy

This drug does not cause drowsiness.

Mild side effects may disappear within a few days or a couple of weeks. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if they’re more severe or don’t go away.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.
SECTION 3 of 4

sodium-hyaluronate May Interact with Other Medications

Injectable solution

Hyaluronate can interact with other medications, herbs, or vitamins you might be taking. Your healthcare provider will look out for interactions with your current medications. Always be sure to tell your doctor about all medications, herbs or vitamins you’re taking.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.
Drug warnings
active infection
People with active infection or skin disease at injection site

Tell your doctor if you have any infection or skin disease on your knee. This drug is injected directly into your knee joint. The chance of developing an infection in your knee is increased if you have an active infection at that site.

poultry or egg allergy
People with poultry or egg allergy

Tell your doctor if you’re allergic to bird proteins, feathers, or egg products. Three brands of this drug are made from bird sources: Hyalgan, Orthovisc, and Supartz.

bleeding disorders
People with bleeding disorders

This drug is injected directly into your knee joint. The risk of bleeding at the injection site may be increased if you have a bleeding disorder, such as:

  • hemophilia
  • Von Willebrands’ disease
  • platelet dysfunction
  • idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • factor deficiency
pregnant woman
Pregnant women

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) hasn’t assigned a pregnancy category to this drug. The safety and effectiveness of this drug haven’t been established in pregnant women.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. This drug should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

breastfeeding
Women who are breast-feeding

It isn’t known if this drugpasses into breast milk. You and your doctor may need to decide if you’ll take this drug or breastfeed.

children
For children

Children: The safety and effectiveness of this drug haven’t been established in children under the age of 18 years.

Young adults: The safety and effectiveness of this drug haven’t been established in adults under the age of 22 years for the brand Monovisc.

allergies
Allergies

This drug can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

  • hives
  • itching
  • red, swollen skin
  • tightness in your chest
  • trouble breathing
  • swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • sudden drop in blood pressure. Symptoms may include dizziness, feeling faint, and trouble breathing.

Tell your doctor if you’re allergic to bird (avian) proteins, feathers, or egg products. Three brands of hyaluronate are made from bird proteins:

  • Hyalgan
  • Monovisc
  • Supartz

Tell your doctor if you’re allergic to gram-positive bacteria proteins if you’re taking Monovisc. You may not be able to take the drug.

Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it or other products that contain hyaluronan. Taking it a second time after any allergic reaction could be fatal.

SECTION 4 of 4

How to Take sodium-hyaluronate (Dosage)

Injectable solution

Your doctor will determine a dose that’s right for you based on your individual needs. Your general health may affect your dose. Tell your doctor about all health conditions you have before your doctor or nurse administers the drug to you.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always to speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.
Pharmacist's Advice
Clinical Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy

This drug comes with risks if you don’t take it as prescribed by your doctor.

If you stop or miss doses

If you don’t receive your injections or don’t receive it when you’re supposed to, you may still experience pain in your knee.

What to do if you miss a dose/appointment

If you miss an appointment, call your doctor right away to reschedule it.

How to tell the drug is working

You may be able to tell the drug is working if you experience less knee pain and are able to move around better.

This is a short-term treatment.

Important considerations for taking this drug

How long does it take?

This injection usually only takes a few minutes. This drug is given as an injection into one or both knee joints (intra-articular) at your doctor’s office. Some formulations or brands require weekly injections at your doctor’s office for a total of 3–5 doses.

Can I drive home after?

Someone may need to drive you home. It’s important that you limit your physical activity for up to 48 hours after your injection to keep your knee from swelling. Don’t jog, play tennis, lift heavy objects, or stand for more than an hour at a time.

Travel

You may be unable to get your dose if you travel. Check with your doctor on how to receive your medication while you’re away.

Clinical monitoring

Knee joint infection (septic arthritis). Your doctor may monitor you for signs of knee joint infection.

Bleeding at the injection site. Your doctor may monitor you for signs of bleeding at the injection site. The risk for bleeding at the injection site may be increased if you take blood thinners or have a bleeding disorder.

Insurance

Many insurance companies will require a prior authorization before they approve and pay for these injections.


Show Sources

Content developed in collaboration with University of Illinois-Chicago, Drug Information Group

Medically reviewed by Creighton University, Center for Drug Information and Evidence-Based Practice on June 1, 2015

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement