Generic Name: insulin-aspart, Injectable Solution

Generic Name:

insulin-aspart, Injectable Solution

NovoLog,NovoLog Flexpen,NovoLog PenFill

All Brands

  • NovoLog
  • NovoLog Flexpen
  • NovoLog PenFill
SECTION 1 of 4

Highlights for insulin-aspart

Injectable Solution
1

NovoLog is a form of insulin used to treat diabetes. It works to regulate the sugar in your blood.

2

NovoLog can cause very low blood sugar levels. Talk to your doctor about how to recognize and treat low blood sugar. Don’t take NovoLog if you have low blood sugar.

3

Never share NovoLog insulin delivery devices. Sharing these items increases your risk of passing or receiving diseases.

4

NovoLog can cause a severe allergic reaction. Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to NovoLog or any component of NovoLog.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Potassium warning

If you have low potassium or take medications that lower potassium, NovoLog can lower your level more. This can lead to breathing problems, heart problems, and death.

Mixing insulins

Don’t mix NovoLog with any other insulin besides NPH insulin. If used together, be sure to draw up NovoLog first into the syringe and then NPH insulin. Don’t mix NovoLog with any other insulin if you have an insulin pump.

Drug Features

NovoLog is a self-injected prescription medication. It’s available in these forms: injectable suspension and prefilled syringe.

This drug may be used as part of a combination therapy. That means you may need to take it with other drugs.

Why It's Used

NovoLog is used to treat type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

How It Works

Novolog works to replace or increase the amount of insulin in your body.

More Details

How It Works

Novolog works to replace or increase the amount of insulin in your body. This helps you to better control your blood sugar.

If you have type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin. NovoLog replaces the insulin in your body to lower your blood sugar.

If you have type 2 diabetes, your body may not make enough insulin or doesn’t respond to the insulin it’s making. NovoLog increases the amount of insulin in your body to better control your blood sugar.

SECTION 2 of 4

insulin-aspart Side Effects

Injectable Solution

Most Common Side Effects

The most common side effects that occur with NovoLog are:

  • low blood sugar

  • dizziness

  • lightheadedness

  • blurred vision

  • anxiety, irritability, or mood changes

  • sweating

  • slurred speech

  • hunger

  • confusion

  • shakiness

  • headache

  • injection site reactions, including:

    • itching
    • rash
    • skin thickening or pits at the injection site
  • weight gain

  • swelling of your hands and feet

Serious Side Effects

If you experience any of these serious side effects, call your doctor right away. If your symptoms are potentially life threatening or if you think you’re experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

  • serious allergic reaction. Symptoms may include:

    • skin rash
    • itching
    • hives
    • swelling of your face, lips, or tongue
    • breathing problems
  • fast heart rate

  • sweating

  • extreme drowsiness

  • dizziness

  • confusion

Pharmacist's Advice
Healthline Pharmacist Editorial Team

NovoLog does not cause drowsiness.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.
SECTION 3 of 4

insulin-aspart May Interact with Other Medications

Injectable Solution

NovoLog can interact with other medications, herbs, or vitamins you might be taking. That’s why your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. If you’re curious about how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Note: You can reduce your chances of drug interactions by having all of your prescriptions filled at the same pharmacy. That way, a pharmacist can check for possible drug interactions.

Alcohol Interaction

Avoid alcohol or limit alcohol while taking NovoLog.

Alcohol may affect your ability to control blood sugar when you’re taking NovoLog. Your blood sugar levels should be closely monitored and your dose of insulin may need to be changed if you drink alcohol.

Medications That Might Interact with This Drug

Diabetes medications

These include:

  • oral diabetes medications
  • pramlintide

These medications lower your blood sugar. Combining them with Novolog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Blood pressure drugs

These medications lower your blood sugar. Combining them with Novolog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels:

  • enalapril
  • lisinopril
  • captopril
  • angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors

The following blood pressure medication lowers the effect of NovoLog:

  • diuretics, including:
    • bumetanide
    • chlorothiazide
    • chlorthalidone
    • furosemide
    • hydrochlorothiazide
    • metolazone
    • torsemide

Combining the following medications with NovoLog may work to increase or decrease your blood sugar. They may also hide some of the symptoms of low blood sugar:

  • beta blockers:
    • propranolol
    • metoprolol
    • atenolol
  • clonidine

The following drugs may hide the symptoms of low blood sugar:

  • guanethidine
  • reserpine

Heart drug
  • disopyramide

This medication lowers your blood sugar. Combining it with NovoLog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Antidepressants
  • fluoxetine
  • monoamine oxidase inhibitors, such as:
    • isocarboxazid (Marplan)
    • phenelzine (Nardil)
    • tranylcypromine (Parnate)
    • selegiline (Emsam, Eldepryl, Zelapar)

These medications lower your blood sugar. Combining them with NovoLog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

High triglycerides drugs
  • fibrates, such as:
    • fenofibrate
    • bezafibrate
    • clofibrate

This medication lowers your blood sugar. Combining it with NovoLog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Drugs that affect blood
  • pentoxifylline
  • salicylates

These medications lower your blood sugar. Combining them with NovoLog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Hormone drug
  • octreotide

This medication lowers your blood sugar. Combining it with NovoLog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Antibiotics
  • sulfonamide antibiotics
  • sulfamethoxazole with or without trimethoprim

These medications lower your blood sugar. Combining them with NovoLog may cause dangerously low blood sugar levels.

Pentamidine can decrease blood sugar at first, then cause an increase in blood sugars later when used with NovoLog.

Allergy, asthma drugs
  • corticosteroids
  • epinephrine
  • albuterol
  • terbutaline

These medications may lower the effect of NovoLog.

Oral contraceptives
  • estrogens
  • progesterone

These medications may lower the effect of NovoLog.

HIV drugs, protease inhibitors

Examples are:

  • ritonavir
  • saquinavir
  • darunavir
  • atazanavir
  • fosamprenavir
  • nelfinavir
  • tipranavir
  • lopinavir

These medications may lower the effect of NovoLog.

Mood disorder drugs

These medications may lower the effect of NovoLog:

  • olanzapine
  • clozapine
  • phenothiazine

This medication can increase or decrease your blood sugar:

  • lithium salts

Cholesterol drug
  • niacin

This medication may lower the effect of NovoLog.

Tuberculosis drug
  • isoniazid

This medication may lower the effect of NovoLog.

Endocrine disorder drugs
  • danazol
  • glucagon
  • somatropin
  • thyroid hormones

These medications may lower the effect of NovoLog.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.

People with kidney problems

If you have kidney problems, you may be more sensitive to NovoLog and may need lower doses of insulin.

People with liver problems

If you have liver problems, your body may not get rid of insulin as quickly and you may need lower doses of insulin.

People with low blood sugar

Don’t use this medication if you already have low blood sugar. NovoLog may make it even lower.

People with low potassium

If you have low potassium or take medications that lower potassium, NovoLog can lower your level more. This can lead to breathing problems, heart problems, and death.

Pregnant women

NovoLog is a pregnancy category B drug. That means two things:

  1. Studies of the drug in pregnant animals have not shown risk to the fetus.
  2. There aren’t enough studies done in pregnant women to show the drug poses a risk to the fetus.

Women who are nursing

You can breastfeed while taking NovoLog. The medication shouldn’t pose any risk to a breastfeeding child.

For Seniors

If you’re a senior, you may be more sensitive to NovoLog. You may need lower starting doses to avoid low blood sugar.

When to call the doctor

Tell your doctor if you’re sick, not eating, throwing up, or have changed your meal or exercise schedule. Your NovoLog dose may need to be adjusted or you may need to be checked for severe complications of diabetes.

Allergies

Severe, life-threatening allergic reactions can happen with NovoLog. If you think you’re having a severe allergic reaction, get medical help right away.

Signs of NovoLog allergy include:

  • rash all over your body
  • shortness of breath
  • wheezing (trouble breathing)
  • fast pulse
  • sweating
  • low blood pressure
SECTION 4 of 4

How to Take insulin-aspart (Dosage)

Injectable Solution

You doctor will calculate your dose depending on the type of diabetes you have, your weight, and if you’ve received insulin before.

The initial dose varies from person to person.

Your dose should be adjusted based on your blood glucose measurements. Your dosage and time of injection should only be changed with your doctor’s guidance.

What Are You Taking This Medication For?

Type 1 diabetes
Form: Injectable suspension
Strengths:
  • 100 unit/mL 10 mL vial
  • 100 unit/mL 3 mL PenFill cartridges
Form: Prefilled syringes
Strengths:
  • 100 unit/mL 3 mL NovoLog FlexPen
  • 100 unit/mL 3 mL NovoLog FlexTouch
Adult Dosage (ages 18 years and older)

0.5–1 unit per kilogram of bodyweight per day.

Child Dosage (ages 2-17 years)

0.5–1 unit per kilogram of bodyweight per day.

Child Dosage (ages 0-1 year)

A safe and effective dosage hasn’t been established for this age group.

Special Considerations

Liver disease: If you have liver disease, you may have decreased ability to make glucose and to break down NovoLog. Your dose may need to be lowered.

Kidney disease: If you have kidney disease, you may have decreased ability to break down NovoLog. Your dose may need to be lowered.

People over the age of 65 years: NovoLog should be used with caution if you’re over 65 years of age. It may be more difficult to recognize signs and symptoms of low blood sugar. You may also be more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Your doctor may start you with a lower dose and increase your dose more slowly.

Type 2 diabetes
Form: Injectable suspension
Strengths:
  • 100 unit/mL 10 mL vial
  • 100 unit/mL 3 mL PenFill cartridges
Form: Prefilled syringes
Strengths:
  • 100 unit/mL 3 mL NovoLog FlexPen
  • 100 unit/mL 3 mL NovoLog FlexTouch
Adult Dosage (ages 18 years and older)

0.5–1 unit per kilogram of bodyweight per day.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

A safe and effective dosage hasn’t been established for this age group.

Special Considerations

Liver disease: If you have liver disease, you may have decreased ability to make glucose and to break down NovoLog. Your dose may need to be lowered.

Kidney disease: If you have kidney disease, you may have decreased ability to break down NovoLog. Your dose may need to be lowered.

People over the age of 65 years: NovoLog should be used with caution if you’re over 65 years of age. It may be more difficult to recognize signs and symptoms of low blood sugar. You may also be more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Your doctor may start you with a lower dose and increase your dose more slowly.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always to speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.
Pharmacist's Advice
Healthline Pharmacist Editorial Team

NovoLog comes with risks if you don’t take it as prescribed.

If You Don’t Take It or Miss Injections

Your blood sugar can become very high, which can cause fainting, coma, or death. Symptoms of high blood sugar include: increased thirst, urinating often, feeling very hungry, extreme fatigue, and drowsiness.

If You Take Too Much

You may get very low blood sugar and low potassium levels. You can treat mild low blood sugar by:

  • eating 3–4 glucose tablets
  • eating 5–7 pieces of candy
  • drinking ½ cup of fruit juice
  • drinking 1 cup of fat free milk

If you feel like passing out due to very low blood sugar, contact the emergency room right away. You may need treatment with a glucagon injection or be treated at the hospital.

What to Do If You Miss a Dose

If you miss a dose, test your blood sugar. Your blood sugar may be high. If so, take your dose as needed. However, this medication typically works for 3 to 5 hours, so you may have to adjust your dosing schedule. If it’s 1 or 2 hours before your next dose, wait and then take a single dose at the usual time.

Never try to catch up by taking two doses at once. This could result in toxic side effects.

How to Tell If the Drug Is Working

You may be able to tell this drug is working if your blood sugar level is within the right range. You may experience fewer symptoms of high blood sugar.

This is a long-term medication.

Eat a meal within 5–10 minutes after your dose

This is important because the medication starts to work quickly.

Be safe by storing this medication properly

Don’t freeze NovoLog, and don’t use it if it’s been frozen. Keep NovoLog away from heat or light.

Store unopened NovoLog vials in the refrigerator (36–46°F [2.2–7.7°C]) until the expiration date on the vial. You can store unopened vials or opened vials at room temperature, but they must be thrown away after 28 days, even if they still have insulin left in them.

Travel

When traveling with your medication:

  • Always carry it with you or in your carry-on bag.
  • Don’t worry about airport X-ray machines. They can’t hurt this medication.
  • You may need to show your pharmacy’s preprinted label to identify the medication. Keep the original prescription-labeled box with you when traveling.
  • This medication needs to be refrigerated if it hasn’t been opened yet. You may need to use an insulated bag with a cold pack to maintain the temperature when traveling.
  • Needles and syringes need to be used to take this medicine. Check for special rules about traveling with medicine, needles, and syringes.

Self-Management

Your doctor, nurse, diabetes educator, or pharmacist will help you give your first dose and teach you how to how to take this injection. Follow directions carefully when you’re giving yourself the injection.

You’ll need the following for the insulin injection:

  • sterile alcohol wipes
  • syringes
  • needles
  • needle clipper
  • container for safe disposal of needles and syringes
  • In order to test your blood sugars at home you may also need lancets, test strips, and home blood glucose monitor.  

Management

  • Inject NovoLog exactly as your healthcare provider has shown you. Your healthcare provider should tell you if you need to pinch your skin before injecting.
  • NovoLog can be injected under your skin in your stomach area, buttocks, and upper legs or upper arms. It can also be infused in an insulin pump or given through a needle in your vein by your healthcare provider.
  • If you inject NovoLog, change your injection sites for each dose.
  • If you use NovoLog in an insulin pump, change your insertion site every 3 days. The insulin in the reservoir should be changed at least every 6 days, even if you haven’t used all of the insulin.
  • If you use NovoLog in an insulin pump, see your insulin pump manual for instructions or talk to your healthcare provider.
  • NPH insulin is the only type of insulin that can be mixed with NovoLog.
  • Only mix NovoLog with NPH insulin if it’s going to be injected right away.
  • Draw up NovoLog into the syringe before you draw up your NPH insulin.
  • Be sure to use a needle clipper and container for safe disposal of needles and syringes.
  • Don’t reuse needles or use expired insulin.

Clinical Monitoring

Your doctor may perform blood tests to make sure that NovoLog is working and is still safe to use. These may include:

  • blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1C
  • liver function test
  • kidney function tests
  • blood potassium levels

Other tests may be done to check for complications because of high blood sugar. These include:

  • eye exam at least annually
  • foot exam at least annually
  • dental exam at least annually
  • tests for nerve damage
  • cholesterol levels
  • blood pressure and heart rate

Your Diet

Follow the nutrition plan that your doctor, dietician, or diabetes educator told you about.

Hidden Costs

Besides the medicine, you’ll need to buy sterile alcohol wipes, syringes, and needles. You may also need a needle clipper and container for safe disposal of needles and syringes.

In order to test your blood sugar at home, you may also need lancets, test strips, and home blood glucose monitor.

Insurance

Many insurance companies will require a prior authorization before they approve the prescription and pay for NovoLog.

Are There Any Alternatives?

There are other drugs available to treat your condition. Some may be more suitable for you than others. Talk to your doctor about possible alternatives.


Show Sources

Content developed in collaboration with University of Illinois-Chicago, Drug Information Group

Medically reviewed by Creighton University, Center for Drug Information and Evidence-Based Practice on June 18, 2015

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

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