Generic Name: anakinra, Parenteral Solution

Kineret

All Brands

  • Kineret
SECTION 1 of 4

Highlights for anakinra

Parenteral Solution
1

Anakinra is an injected drug used to treat inflammation and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease.

2 3

The most common side effects that occur with anakinra include injection site reactions, headache, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, joint pain, and fever.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Decreased white blood cells

Your doctor will need to take blood tests before you take this medication and during treatment.

Inability to fight infections

This medication may make you unable to fight infections. Call your healthcare provider right away if you experience:

  • an infection
  • signs of an infection, including a fever or chills
  • open sores on your body

Don’t receive live vaccines, such as the nasal flu vaccine, while you use anakinra. You may get the infection that the vaccine is designed to fight. You can receive other types of vaccines while you use this drug.

E. coli allergy warning

Don’t use anakinra if you’re allergic to proteins made from the bacteria E. coli. Ask your healthcare provider if you aren’t sure.

Severe kidney disease

This condition may make it harder for you to clear anakinra from your body. Your doctor may change how often you use anakinra. Be sure to tell your doctor if you have a history of kidney disease before you start taking it.

Drug Features

Anakinra is a prescription drug. It’s available as an under-the-skin (subcutaneous) injection.

This drug may be used as part of a combination therapy. That means you may need to take it with other drugs.

Why It's Used

Anakinra is used to reduce the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to stop RA from getting worse, and to treat neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID).

More Details

How It Works

Anakinra works by blocking the activity of a protein called interleukin in your body. This protein can cause inflammation and joint damage. It belongs to a class of drugs called interleukin-1 receptor antagonists.

Why It's Used

Anakinra is used to reduce the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to stop RA from getting worse, and to treat neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID).

It’s not recommended as a first line therapy for RA. That means it’s usually started after you’ve already been treated with a different medications that didn’t work well. 

SECTION 2 of 4

anakinra Side Effects

Parenteral Solution

Most Common Side Effects

The most common side effects that occur with anakinra include: 

  • injection site reactions, such as:

    • redness
    • rash
    • swelling
    • itching
    • bruising
  • headache

  • nausea and vomiting

  • diarrhea

  • joint pain

  • fever

  • flu-like symptoms, such as chills and body aches

  • sore throat or runny nose

  • sinus infection

  • stomach pain

Serious Side Effects

If you experience any of these serious side effects, call your doctor right away. If your symptoms are potentially life threatening or if you think you’re experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

  • serious infections. Signs include:

    • fever or chills
    • open sores on your body
  • allergic reactions. Symptoms may include:

    • swelling of your face, lips, mouth, or tongue
    • trouble breathing
    • wheezing
    • severe itching
    • skin rash, redness, or swelling outside of the injection site area
    • dizziness or fainting
    • fast heartbeat or pounding in your chest
    • excessive sweating
Pharmacist's Advice
Healthline Pharmacist Editorial Team

Anakinra does not cause drowsiness.

It’s common to have injection site reactions. These include redness, rash, swelling, itching, or bruising. These symptoms will usually go away within a few days. Call your doctor right away if you have pain, redness, or swelling around the injection site that gets worse or doesn’t go away within a few days.

Other mild side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist If they’re more severe or don’t go away.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible side effects. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always discuss possible side effects with a healthcare provider who knows your medical history.
SECTION 3 of 4

anakinra May Interact with Other Medications

Parenteral Solution

Anakinra may interact with other medications, herbs, or vitamins you might be taking. That’s why your doctor should manage all of your medications carefully. If you’re curious about how this drug might interact with something else you’re taking, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Note: You can reduce your chances of drug interactions by having all of your prescriptions filled at the same pharmacy. That way, a pharmacist can check for possible drug interactions.

Medications That Might Interact with This Drug

TNF inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs

Anakinra can interact with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. This type of drug is used to block inflammation that happens because of an immune system response.

Combining anakinra with these medications increases your chance of getting serious infections.

Vaccines

Don’t receive a live vaccine while taking anakinra and for at least 3 months after stopping the medication. The vaccine may not fully protect you from disease, and you may get an infection from the vaccine. Live vaccines include:

  • measles, mumps, and rubella
  • chicken pox (varicella)
  • nasal flu vaccine

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs interact differently in each person, we cannot guarantee that this information includes all possible interactions. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always speak with your healthcare provider about possible interactions with all prescription drugs, vitamins, herbs and supplements, and over-the-counter drugs that you are taking.

People with kidney disease

If you have severe kidney disease, it may be harder for your body to clear anakinra from your body. This can lead to toxic effects. Your doctor may tell you to use anakinra every other day instead of every day.

People with E. coli allergy

Don’t use anakinra if you’re allergic to proteins made from bacteria called E. coli. Ask your healthcare provider if you aren’t sure.

People with latex allergy

Tell your doctor if you’re allergic to rubber or latex. The inner needle cover on the prefilled syringe of anakinra contains latex. Don’t handle the needle cover if you’re allergic to latex.

Pregnant women

Anakinra is a pregnancy category B drug. That means two things:

  1. Studies of the drug in pregnant animals have not shown risk to the fetus.
  2. There aren’t enough studies done in pregnant women to show the drug poses a risk to the fetus.

Tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Anakinra should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Women who are nursing

It isn’t known if anakinra passes through breast milk. If it does, it could cause side effects in a breastfeeding child.

You and your doctor may decide whether you’ll take anakinra or breastfeed.

For Seniors

This medication may lower immunity. If you’re over the age of 65, you may have a higher risk of getting serious infections. Seniors may also have reduced kidney function, which increases risk of serious side effects from anakinra.

For Children

Anakinra is approved for children with neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID). It isn’t approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis in children.

Allergies

Don’t use anakinra if you’re allergic to proteins made from the bacteria E. coli. Ask your healthcare provider if you aren’t sure.

Tell your doctor if you’re allergic to rubber or latex. The inner needle cover on the prefilled syringe contains latex. Don’t handle the needle cover if you’re allergic to latex.

Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Taking it again could be fatal.

SECTION 4 of 4

How to Take anakinra (Dosage)

Parenteral Solution

All possible dosages and forms may not be included here. Your dose, form, and how often you take it will depend on:

  • your age
  • the condition being treated
  • how severe your condition is
  • other medical conditions you have
  • how you react to the first dose

What Are You Taking This Medication For?

Rheumatoid arthritis

Brand: Kineret

Form: Self-injectable prefilled syringe/solution
Strengths: 100 mg/0.67 mL solution
Adult Dosage (ages 18 years and older)

The dose is 100 mg per day by injection under the skin.

Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)

A safe and effective dosage hasn’t been established for this age group.

Special Considerations

Kidney Disease: If you have severe kidney disease, your doctor may tell you to use anakinra every two days instead of every day.

Neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease

Brand: Kineret

Form: Self-injectable prefilled syringe/solution
Strengths: 100 mg/0.67 mL solution
Child Dosage (ages 0-17 years)
  • The dose is based on body weight. Your doctor will tell you how much of the medicine to give your child.
  • The starting dose may be 1–2 mg per kilogram of body weight per day.
  • The dose can be increased up to 8 mg per kg of body weight per day.
Special Considerations

Kidney Disease: If you have severe kidney disease, your doctor may tell you to use anakinra every two days instead of every day.

Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information. However, because drugs affect each person differently, we cannot guarantee that this list includes all possible dosages. This information is not a substitute for medical advice. Always to speak with your doctor or pharmacist about dosages that are right for you.
Pharmacist's Advice
Healthline Pharmacist Editorial Team

Anakinra comes with risks if you don’t take it as prescribed.

If You Don’t Take It at All

Your symptoms may not get better and they may get worse.

If You Stop Taking It

Your symptoms may return or become worse if you stop taking this medication.

What to Do If You Miss Doses

If you accidentally miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. Never double up on doses to catch up.

How to Tell If the Drug Is Working

You may be able to tell if this drug is working for RA if you experience fewer symptoms, less pain, and if your condition doesn’t get worse.

You may be able to tell if it’s working for NOMID if your child’s symptoms get better. These include fever, rash, and joint pain.

Anakinra is a long-term drug treatment.

Take the dose at the same time each day

Anakinra is usually given once per day. In some cases the dosage is split.

Store anakinra in the refrigerator

Keep in temperatures from 36–46°F (2.2–7.7°C). Don’t freeze or shake the medication. Don’t use anakinra if it has been frozen, even if it’s thawed.

Protect it from light and keep it out of reach of children.

Keep it away from extreme heat or cold.

Don’t use the medication after the expiration date printed on the label.

Travel

When traveling with your medication:

  • Carry anakinra prefilled syringes with you in a travel cooler at a temperature of 36–46°F (2.2–7.7°C). Be sure not to freeze it.
  • Generally, you’re allowed to carry anakinra prefilled syringes with you on an airplane. Be sure to carry the prefilled syringes with you on board the plane. Don’t put them in your checked luggage.
  • Don’t worry about airport X-ray machines. They can’t hurt this medication.
  • Keep anakinra in the original carton with its original preprinted labels and protected from light.
  • Your healthcare provider may know about special carrying cases for injectable medicines.
  • If syringes don’t stay cool for an extended period of time, they may be dangerous to use.
  • Be sure you have enough medication before you leave on your trip. It may be difficult to get this medication while traveling since it isn’t always in stock at every pharmacy.

Self-Management

Your doctor or nurse will give you instructions on how to use anakinra. Don’t inject yourself or your child until you’ve received proper training.

  • Use each anakinra prefilled syringe only 1 time. Do not use a syringe more than 1 time. Do not recap a needle.
  • You may not have to use all of the liquid medicine in the prefilled syringe. Your doctor will show you how to find the correct dose of anakinra for you or your child.
  • If you notice that some medicine is left in the prefilled syringe, don’t inject again with the same prefilled syringe.
  • If you drop a prefilled syringe, don’t use it. The glass syringe may be broken, or the needle may be bent or dirty. Throw away the prefilled syringe and replace it with a new one. Take a new prefilled syringe from what would be the last day of the week in your current box. For example, if you start on Wednesday, the last day of the week in your series is Tuesday. After using all the remaining prefilled syringes in your current box, start your next box of anakinra prefilled syringes.

You’ll need these additional supplies to give your anakinra injection:

  • alcohol wipes
  • dry, sterile gauze or tissue
  • puncture-resistant needle disposal container

Clinical Monitoring

Blood test: Anakinra may cause you to have a lower number of certain white blood cells, which can increase your risk of infections. You may have blood tests before starting treatment with anakinra, then again every month for 3 months, and then quarterly for a year.

Infection: This medication lowers your immune system and puts you at risk of infection. Your doctor may monitor you for signs of infection.

Kidney test: Your doctor may take a blood test to check your kidneys and make sure they’re working correctly before you start anakinra. If your kidneys aren’t working as well as they should, your dose may need to be lowered.

Hidden Costs

Besides the medicine, you’ll need to purchase sterile alcohol wipes, gauze, and a container for safe disposal of needles and syringes.

Insurance

Many insurance companies will require a prior authorization before they approve the prescription and pay for anakinra.

Are There Any Alternatives?

There are other drugs available to treat your condition. Some may be more suitable for you than others. Talk to your doctor about possible alternatives.


Show Sources

Content developed in collaboration with University of Illinois-Chicago, Drug Information Group

Medically reviewed by Creighton University, Center for Drug Information and Evidence-Based Practice on May 26, 2015

Send us your feedback

Thank you.

Your message has been sent.

We're sorry, an error occurred.

We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later.

Disclaimer: Healthline has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Read This Next

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs
Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs
Understanding Biologic Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis
Understanding Biologic Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis
Is Maltodextrin Bad for Me?
Is Maltodextrin Bad for Me?
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement