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  • Basic Info
Licensed from
Generic: resveratrol
treats Cancer and Cardiovascular disease
               



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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Based on preliminary laboratory study, resveratrol may have additive effects when taken with antifungals, such as nystatin. There may be a protective effect of trans- resveratrol on gentamicin- induced kidney toxicity.

Laboratory study suggests that resveratrol has anti- aggregating and antithrombin activity and may have additive effects when taken with other drugs with the same actions. Use of resveratrol with antiplatelet drugs like clodipogrel (Plavix®), dipyridamole (Persantine®), non- steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and aspirin or anticoagulant drugs like warfarin (Coumadin®) could cause increased risk of bleeding.

Resveratrol may increase the effects of some antivirals, including antiretroviral HIV medications.

Based on laboratory and animal study, the use of resveratrol with antihypertensive/ cardiovascular drugs may result in additive effects.

Based on laboratory study, resveratrol may sensitize or enhance the efficacy of anticancer drugs, such as paclitaxel or actinomycin D.

Based on laboratory study, resveratrol may antagonize the effects of cardiac glycosides, such as digoxin or digoxin- like drugs.

Cholesterol levels have been lowered in rats, although the clinical significance is unknown in humans. In theory, resveratrol could increase the effects of cholesterol- lowering drugs such as HMG- CoA reductase inhibitors ("statins") or bile acid sequestering agents (cholestyramine).

Based on preliminary data, resveratrol may enhance the immune suppression caused by cyclosporine A.

Drinking large quantities of red wine, which contains resveratrol, may have adverse effects on the liver. Preliminary evidence suggests that resveratrol may weakly inhibit the way that the liver breaks down certain drugs, herbs, and supplements (inhibits multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes).

Based on resveratrol's chemical structure, which is similar to that of the synthetic estrogen agonist diethylstilbestrol, resveratrol may function as an estrogen agonist and exhibit an additive effect when taken in conjunction with estradiol. However, limited laboratory study has shown resveratrol acting as an estrogen antagonist. Resveratrol may have the potential to act as both an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on a variety of factors.

Based on preliminary study, resveratrol may interact with MAOIs such as phenelzine (Nardil®) and tranylcypromine (Parnate®). This effect has not been confirmed in humans.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Based on preliminary laboratory study, resveratrol may have additive effects when taken with antifungal herbs and supplements. There may be a protective effect of trans- resveratrol on gentamicin- induced kidney toxicity.

Laboratory study suggests that resveratrol has anti- aggregating and antithrombin activity and may have additive effects when taken with other herbs and supplements with the same actions.

Resveratrol may increase the effects of some antivirals.

Theoretically, the use of resveratrol with blood pressure- lowering or cardiovascular herbs and supplements may result in additive effects.

Resveratrol may antagonize the effects of cardiac glycoside herbs that are similar to digoxin or foxglove.

Cholesterol levels have been lowered in rats, although the clinical significance is unknown. In theory, resveratrol could increase the effects of herbs and supplements like garlic, guggul, red rice yeast, or niacin.

Drinking large quantities of red wine, which contains resveratrol, may have adverse effects on the liver. Preliminary evidence suggests that resveratrol may weakly inhibit the way that the liver breaks down certain herbs and supplements (inhibits multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes).

Based on resveratrol's chemical structure, resveratrol may function as an estrogen agonist and exhibit an additive effect when taken with estradiol. However, limited laboratory study has shown resveratrol acting as an estrogen antagonist. Resveratrol may have the potential to act as both an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on a variety of factors.

Based on preliminary study, resveratrol may interact with MAOIs such as St. John's wort. This effect has not been confirmed in humans.

Based on laboratory study, resveratrol may increase inhibitory effects on carcinoma cells when combined with quercetin and rutin. Preliminary study also has shown that resveratrol may enhance the growth inhibitory effects of vitamin D.

               
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