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  • Basic Info
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What may interact with this medicine?

  • other medicines for diabetes

Many medications may cause an increase or decrease in blood sugar, these include:

  • alcohol containing beverages
  • aspirin and aspirin- like drugs
  • chloramphenicol
  • chromium
  • diuretics
  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills
  • heart medicines
  • isoniazid
  • male hormones or anabolic steroids
  • medicines for weight loss
  • medicines for allergies, asthma, cold, or cough
  • medicines for mental problems
  • medicines called MAO Inhibitors like Nardil, Parnate, Marplan, Eldepryl
  • niacin
  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen
  • pentamidine
  • phenytoin
  • probenecid
  • quinolone antibiotics like ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ofloxacin
  • some herbal dietary supplements
  • steroid medicines like prednisone or cortisone
  • thyroid medicine

Some medications can hide the warning symptoms of low blood sugar. You may need to monitor your blood sugar more closely if you are taking one of these medications. These include:

  • beta- blockers such as atenolol, metoprolol, propranolol
  • clonidine
  • guanethidine
  • reserpine

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your health care professional or doctor for regular checks on your progress. To control your diabetes you must use this medicine regularly and follow a diet and exercise schedule. Checking and recording your blood sugar and urine ketone levels regularly is important. Use a blood sugar measuring device before you treat high or low blood sugar.

Always carry a quick- source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure family members know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once.

Make sure that you have the right kind of syringe for the type of insulin you use. Try not to change the brand and type of insulin or syringe unless your health care professional or doctor tells you to. Switching insulin brand or type can cause dangerously high or low blood sugar. Always keep an extra supply of insulin, syringes, and needles on hand. Use a syringe one time only. Throw away syringe and needle in a closed container to prevent accidental needle sticks.

Insulin pens and cartridges should never be shared. Sharing may result in passing of viruses like hepatitis or HIV.

Wear a medical identification bracelet or chain to say you have diabetes, and carry a card that lists all your medications.

Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect diabetes control or can alter the results of tests used to monitor blood sugar. Avoid alcohol. Avoid products that contain alcohol or sugar.

               
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