Advertisement
 2  3  4  5  
  • Basic Info
Licensed from
Generic: bilberry
an herbal product - treats Atherosclerosis, Diabetes mellitus, Painful menstruation, Diarrhea, Cataracts, Glaucoma, Retinopathy, Fibrocystic breast disease, Night vision, Chronic venous insufficiency, and Stomach ulcers
               



To get info about second drug, type a name above.


Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Bilberry may lower blood sugar levels, although there is a lack of reliable human studies in this area. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare provider. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Based on human use, bilberry may increase diarrhea when taken with drugs that cause or worsen diarrhea, such as laxatives or some antibiotics. Bilberry theoretically may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti- platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non- steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®). There are no reliable published human reports of bleeding with the use of bilberry. Based on theory, bilberry may further lower blood pressure when taken with drugs that decrease blood pressure.

Based on early laboratory study, berry extracts have been shown to inhibit H. pylori, an ulcer- producing bacteria and enhance the effects of the prescription drug clarithromycin (Biaxin®).

Bilberry may also interact with anticancer agents, liver- damaging agents, and estrogen- containing medications. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Based on animal research, bilberry may lower blood sugar levels. Although there is a lack of reliable human study in this area, caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

Based on theory, bilberry may lower blood pressure further when taken with herbs or supplements that decrease blood pressure.

Based on theory, bilberry may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

Based on traditional use, bilberry may increase diarrhea or laxative effects when taken with herbs and supplements that are also believed to have laxative effects.

Consuming bilberry with quercetin supplements may result in additive effects. Cooking bilberries with water and sugar to make soup may decrease the amount of quercetin by 40%. Berries contain resveratrol, which has been studied as an antioxidant, for cardiovascular disease, and for cancer and may have additive effects when taken with supplements like grape seed.

Bilberry may also interact with anticancer agents, antioxidants, liver- damaging agents, and herbs or supplement with hormonal properties. Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

               
 2  3  4  5  
               
Advertisement