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  • Basic Info
Licensed from
Generic: Triticum aestivum
treats Ulcerative colitis and Beta-thalassemia
               



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Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
AIDS, acne, alcohol dependence, antibilious (removes excess bile), antiperspirant, antipyretic (fever reducer), blood flow disorders, bruises, burns, cancer (peritoneal), chronic skin disorders, circulation, constipation, cough, cystitis, detoxification, diabetes, digestion, eczema, energy enhancement, eye strain, fever, gout (foot inflammation), hypertension (high blood pressure), infection, gingivitis, malaise, pain (abdominal), poison ivy, psoriasis, scar healing, rheumatoid arthritis, sedative, skin ailments, sore throat, sterility, thirst, tooth disease prevention, weight loss aid, wound healing.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

For transfusion dependent beta thalassemia (blood disorder) or ulcerative colitis, 100 milliliters of wheatgrass juice daily has been found effective. Traditionally, 8- 32 ounces of wheatgrass juice has been administered via enemas, rubber bulb syringes or colonics for colon cleansing.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for wheatgrass, and use in children is not recommended.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to wheatgrass. Most wheat allergies are due to the gluten found in the wheatberry. However, wheatgrass does not have any gluten because it is cut before the plant forms a grain (berry).

Some individuals have reported nausea, headaches, hives or swelling in the throat within minutes of drinking its juice. Hives and swollen throat are often signs of a serious allergic reaction and should be handled as an emergency. Anyone having these kinds of symptoms after ingesting wheatgrass may have even more severe reactions to it later.

Side Effects and Warnings

Wheatgrass is generally considered safe. No serious side effects were found in several studies using wheatgrass juice daily for up to one month. There have been no other reports of adverse effects in the available literature. Because it is grown in soils or water and consumed raw, wheatgrass may be contaminated with bacteria, molds or other substances.

Some individuals have reported hives, nausea, or swelling in the throat within minutes of drinking its juice.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Because it is grown in soils or water and consumed raw, wheatgrass may be contaminated with bacteria, molds or other substances. Wheatgrass is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

               
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