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  • Basic Info
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Generic: Mugwort
               



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Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Abortifacient (inducing abortion), addiction (opium), anorexia, anthelminthic (expels worms), antidepressant, antifungal, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, anxiety, asthma, bowel cleansing, cancer, carminative (digestive aid), cathartic, cholagogue (stimulates bile flow), circulatory disorders, convulsions, diaphoretic (promotes sweating), digestion, emmenagogue (promotes menstruation), epilepsy, expectorant, fatigue, fever, food uses, gastric ulcers, gout, headaches, hysteria, infertility, insomnia, irritability, liver disorders, malaria, muscle spasm, nosebleeds, restlessness, rheumatic disorders, snakebites, stimulant, stress, sunstroke, tonic.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for mugwort. Traditionally, 2 cups of mugwort tea (1oz. of fresh mugwort leaf infused 5- 10 minutes, covered, in one pint boiling water) daily for six days has been used.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for mugwort, and use in children is not recommended.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to mugwort, any of its constituents, or to other members of the Compositae/ Asteraceae family including ragweed, chrysanthemums, chamomile, marigolds, and daisies. Allergic responses have been associated with exposure to mugwort including bronchoconstriction/ asthma, upper and lower respiratory tract sensitization, seasonal allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, pollinosis, contact dermatitis, urticaria, and atopic eczema.

Cross- reactivity has been noted between birch, cabbage, grass, hazelnut, olive pollen, honey, mustard, royal jelly, sage, sweet bell pepper pollen, and sunflower. Cross- reactivity has also been demonstrated between mugwort and kiwi, peach, mango, apple, celery, and carrots. A florist with a pre- existing sunflower allergy developed a life- threatening glottal edema after occupational contact with mugwort.

Side Effects and Warnings

There is limited information regarding the adverse effects of mugwort. Mugwort has caused breathing difficulties and skin allergic responses, such as contact dermatitis, urticaria, conjunctivitis, atopic eczema, bronchoconstriction/ asthma, upper and lower respiratory tract sensitization, seasonal allergic rhinitis, pollinosis, and anaphylaxis. According to traditional use and expert opinion, large doses of mugwort may cause abortion, nausea, vomiting, or damage to the nervous system.

Mugwort is on the German Commission E (Germany's regulatory agency for herbs) list of unapproved herbs. Avoid if allergic to birch, grass, hazelnut, olive pollen, honey, mustard, royal jelly, sage, sweet bell pepper pollen, tobacco, and sunflower because cross- reactivity has been noted. Avoid with food allergies to kiwi, peach, mango, apple, celery, and carrots due to cross- reactivity.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Mugwort is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Mugwort is on the German Commission E (Germany's regulatory agency for herbs) list of unapproved herbs. Traditionally, mugwort has been used to induce abortion (abortifacient).

               
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