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  • Basic Info
Licensed from
Generic: Kudzu
treats Deafness, Glaucoma, Diabetic retinopathy, Alcoholism, Menopausal symptoms, Cardiovascular disease / angina, and Diabetes
               



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Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to Pueraria lobata or the Fabaceae/ Leguminosae family. There is one case report of allergic reaction following the use of a combination herbal product containing kudzu involving a maculopapular (elevated, spotted rash- like skin condition) eruption starting on the thighs and spreading over the entire body.

Side Effects and Warnings

Currently, there are no side effects reported of kudzu treatment when taken by mouth. Intravenous puerarin has caused intravascular hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells). Intraperitoneal administration of puerarin or crude extracts of Pueraria lobata caused hypothermia (low body temperature).

In theory, intraperitoneal administration of puerarin or crude extracts of Pueraria lobata may cause hypothermia. Kudzu root may also cause weight loss, although this has not been well studied in humans.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Kudzu is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Kudzu isoflavones are reported to have antiestrogenic activity. Theoretically, kudzu might competitively inhibit the effects of estrogen therapy.

Kudzu extracts or individual isoflavones suppress voluntary alcohol intake in animal models of alcoholism.

The kudzu constituent, daidzin, may have antiarrhythmic properties and, theoretically, kudzu may interfere with antiarrhythmic agents (used to treat irregular heartbeat). Daidzin may also act by inhibiting serotonin and dopamine metabolism. Theoretically, concurrent use of kudzu with drugs that affect the metabolism of serotonin and dopamine (e.g. MAOIs) may lead to increased serotonin levels and increased risk of serotonin syndrome.

Kudzu may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti- platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non- steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Kudzu may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Although not well studied in humans, puerarin may lessen the feelings of anxiety and, theoretically, it may have an antagonistic effect with benzodiazepines. Puerarin may also suppress the bone resorption, promote bone formation and interfere with bisphosphonates. Puerarin may have vasorelaxant properties, possibly by blocking beta- adrenergic receptors.

Kudzu inhibits and induces cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. It is unclear which cytochrome P450 isoenzymes are affected and to what degree. Concurrent use of drugs metabolized by the cytochrome P450 liver enzyme system may result in altered therapeutic levels.

Theoretically, kudzu may interfere with blood pressure lowering agents. Kudzu has vasodilatory (blood vessel dilating) and hypotensive (blood pressure lowering) effects.

Kudzu may weaken the effects of mecamylamine.

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

The kudzu constituent, daidzin, may have antiarrhythmic (treats irregular heartbeat) properties and, theoretically, kudzu may interfere with these antiarrhythmic herbs and supplements.

Kudzu isoflavones may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

Kudzu may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

Kudzu inhibits and induces cytochrome P450 isoenzymes; however, it is unclear which CYP isoenzymes are affected and to what degree. Concurrent use of herbs and supplements metabolized by the cytochrome P450 liver enzyme system may result in altered therapeutic levels.

Kudzu isoflavones are reported to have antiestrogenic activity. Theoretically, kudzu might competitively inhibit the effects of herbs and supplements with estrogen activity.

Theoretically, kudzu may interfere with blood pressure lowering herbs and supplements. Kudzu has vasodilatory (blood vessel dilating) and hypotensive (blood pressure lowering) effects.

The daidzin in kudzu may act by inhibiting serotonin and dopamine metabolism. Theoretically, concurrent use of kudzu with herbs that affect the metabolism of serotonin and dopamine (e.g. MAOIs) may lead to increased serotonin levels and increased risk of serotonin syndrome.

Puerarin may have vasorelaxant properties, possibly by blocking beta- adrenergic receptors.

               
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