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  • Basic Info
Licensed from
Generic: myrrh
an herbal product - treats Motion sickness / seasickness, Rheumatoid arthritis, Shortening labor, Osteoarthritis, Migraine, Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy, Nausea and vomiting, Urinary disorders, Weight loss, Nausea, and Anti-platelet agent
               



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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

There is evidence that ginger may increase stomach acid production. As a result, it theoretically may work against the effects of antacids, sucralfate (Carafate®), or anti- reflux medications such as H- 2 blockers like ranitidine (Zantac®) or proton pump inhibitors like lansoprazole (Prevacid®). In contrast, other laboratory and animal studies report that ginger may act to protect the stomach.

In theory, ginger may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with blood- thinners (although clear human evidence is lacking). Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti- platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non- steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

In theory, large doses of ginger may increase the effects of medications that slow thinking or cause drowsiness.

Ginger may also interfere with medications that change the contraction of the heart, including beta- blockers, digoxin, and other heart medications.

Because ginger can theoretically lower blood sugar levels, it may interfere with the effects of insulin or diabetes medications that are taken by mouth.

Ginger may interact with drugs broken down by the liver or with xanthine oxidase drugs.

Ginger may also interact with drugs taken for nausea/ vomiting, arthritis, blood disorders, high cholesterol, high/ low blood pressure, allergies (antihistamines), cancer, inflammation, vasodilators, or weight loss. Caution is advised when taking ginger with drugs that weaken the immune system, due to a possible interaction.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Ginger may increase stomach acid production. As a result, it theoretically may work against the effects of antacids.

In theory, ginger may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding (although clear human evidence is lacking). Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

In theory, ginger with large amounts of calcium may increase the risk of abnormal heart rhythms. Study results suggest that dietary phytochemicals, such as capsaicin, curcumin, and resveratrol, have inhibitory effects on P- glycoprotein and potencies to cause drug- food interactions.

Ginger may also theoretically lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also affect blood sugar.

Ginger may interact with herbs broken down by the liver or with xanthine oxidase herbs.

Ginger may also interact with herbs or supplements taken for nausea/ vomiting, pain, arthritis, blood disorders, high cholesterol, high/ low blood pressure, allergies (antihistamines), cancer, inflammation, vasodilators, or weight loss. Caution is advised when taking ginger with herbs or supplements that affect the immune system, due to possible interactions. Ginger may have antioxidant properties and use with other antioxidants may result in additive effects.

               
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