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  • Basic Info
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Generic: Carrots
treats Antioxidant, Vitamin A deficiency, and Acute diarrhea
               



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Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Consumption of processed and cooked carrots may alter blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or taking blood sugar- altering medications.

A carrot- rice based rehydration solution may cause diarrhea in children. Caution is advised in patients taking antidiarrheal medications due to conflicting effects.

Several studies in humans suggest that carrot juice may interact with antioxidants. Caution is advised in patients taking antioxidant medications due to possible additive effects.

Although not well studied in humans, carrot extracts may have hormonal effects. Caution is advised in patients taking hormones due to possible additive effects.

Preliminary evidence suggests that consumption of carrots may increase fecal bulking/ weight and dry matter. Caution is advised in patients taking laxatives due to possible additive effects.

Preliminary evidence suggests that consumption of carrots may increase gastrointestinal transit time. Caution is advised in patients taking any medications by mouth.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

A carrot- rice based solution may cause diarrhea in children and therefore, caution is advised in patients taking antidiarrheal herbs or supplements due to conflicting effects.

Several studies in humans suggest that carrot juice may interact with antioxidants. Caution is advised in patients taking other herbs or supplements with antioxidant activity due to possible additive effects.

Consumption of processed and cooked carrots may alter blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients taking blood sugar- altering herbs or supplements.

Preliminary evidence suggests that consumption of carrots may increase fecal bulking/ weight and dry matter. Caution is advised in patients taking laxative herbs or supplements due to possible additive effects.

Ingestion of grated carrots may increase iron, zinc, vitamin A, and vitamin C levels in the blood. Combined use with iron supplements or multivitamins may have additive effects.

Preliminary evidence suggests that consumption of carrots may increase gastrointestinal transit time. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements by mouth.

Although not well studied in humans, carrot extracts may have hormonal effects. Caution is advised in patients on hormone therapy or taking hormonal supplements.

Based on a clinical study in breastfeeding women, ingestion of grated carrots may increase serum levels.

               
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