This is the fourth year of Diabetes Blog Week dreamed up by D-Peep Karen Graffeo, who blogs over at Bitter-Sweet, and today's prompt asks us to take a stand on all the hubbub we've seen in our Diabetes Online Community lately relating to petitions that call for change.

Here's what Karen asks of us today:DBlogWeekLogo Box 2013

Recently, various petitions have been circulating the DOC, so today let's pretend to write our own. Tell us who you would write the petition to — a person, an organization, even an object (animate or inanimate)? Get creative! What are you trying to change and what have you experienced that makes you want this change?

On that note, we bring you:

 

We, The Undersigned (FACIs)

A problem exists within our community.

News nuggets from around the diabetes community

NEWSFLASH: FDA Clears Dexcom Share Direct
Dexcom gets regulatory approval of its 'on-the-go' mobile apps for CGM data-sharing.
Snail Uses Insulin to Poison Fish
New study shows these slow-moving creatures use toxic form of insulin to capture prey.
A New Square Patch Insulin Pump
TouchéMedical's new Bluetooth-enabled patch pump is supposedly the world's smallest and cheapest.

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One that deserves immediate attention, and I've crafted this petition in order to bring more awareness to our cause and hopefully spark some action on this important topic.

Simply, our health is at risk. Lives are in danger. All because of diabetes and hypoglycemia. Yes, those perilous low blood sugars that can so quickly sucker punch us in the gut without any warning.

Why should you care?

The Diabetes Community touches our lives, pretty much every day. Even if we think we are safe thanks to constant blood sugar checks, watchful parents or spouses, and continuous glucose monitors (CGMS) that alarm in the night. That is just a false sense of security, like a calm before a storm. No matter what part of that diverse D-House we may reside, the bottom line is that no one in our community is safe.

Do you think I'm joking? That this doesn't touch you and you're somehow immune to this danger?

Don't kid yourself. It's only a matter of time before you face the horror that is Hypo-Induced Packaging Aggression.

I speak from experience. In the particular diabetic household where I live, this issue has hit our world hard.

The classic symptoms I've experienced are probably ones you've seen up close and personal yourself: rumblings in the middle of the night, when everyone should be asleep but instead the low blood sugars sweep in and cause chaos. From somewhere that seems off in the distance, someone loudly says "Need Juice" or "Get Sugar." It's all muffled noise, until suddenly, the lights snap on and you're blinded by the light.

That's when it happens.

Thanks to an ongoing hypo, you are torn apart, beaten senseless, tortured before ultimately being devoured by the Person with Diabetes.

Take it from me, a juice box. These situations are downright scary and your whole nutrition label flashes before your eyes when that person appears over you, craving your quick-acting carb count.

Hypo-Induced AggressionIf you're a juice box like me, the plastic-sealed straw is ripped from your back as the PWD begins swearing under his or her breath about you being too difficult to open. Maybe the straw does get unwrapped, and then you're stabbed in the head multiple times, as the PWD swears even more because it's not working right. I've seen it happen to those in my own family, where the faulty straw is discarded on the floor in a fit of rage and then the PWD grabs a knife from the counter and jabs it into my beloved juicy loved ones.

It can happen to any of us -- pudding cups, candy packs, bags of cookies -- whether we're in the kitchen or the pantry or refrigerator or hiding in another room.

Skittles, smarties, glucose tabs, candies, apple sauce... really anything with carbs that could be within reach face this danger. Even containers of juice in the fridge aren't immune from this aggression, as we all get roughhoused by the panicked PWD.

Afterwards, most of us are just left on the floor, table or counter, humiliated as we're reduced to empty boxes or wrappers and unable to again be productive members of the Kitchen Community.

We deserve respect, like any other food/candy/drink is given when BGs are in range and they are given a proper burial in the trash basket.

This must be stopped, and that's why I've created this petition. Now, this may not seem as important to some when compared to more pressing petitions like the government's creation of a Death Star. But I urge you to consider signing this, because as a community we must unite against this Hypo-Induced Packaging Aggression (a new form of HIPA!).

In fighting for this awareness, that may mean working with the very PWDs who are often the ones victimizing our kind.

These sometimes-aggressive and hypo-panicked PWDs know the issue well, and they've got their own petitions and initiatives aimed at trying to get better technology that will help them fight off these Lows. There's something called the Low Glucose Suspend that's been effective in Europe, and word is it's coming soon to the U.S. CGM sensors are getting more accurate, and future technology is promising a "crystal ball effect" to curb hypos before they happen. Those are all promising notes, but it still doesn't eliminate the issue 100%.

We must be aware of the continuing-risk of hypos short of a diabetes cure, and in doing so we must insist that we Fast-Acting Carb Items (FACIs?) be treated with respect when these scary situations arise.

Please sign our petition calling for more PWD Awareness of HIPA against FACIs.

Seriously, you should sign. (Add name below, in comments).Crushed Juice Box

Sincerely,

Mr. Juicy Juice Apple Juice #104, & The Undersigned Carb Count Clan of 15g

 

This is our Day 2 post for D-Blog Week, and you can see all the other takes on this prompt by clicking here. You can also follow along on Twitter using the hashtag #DBlogWeek. Enjoy!

 
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This content is created for Diabetes Mine, a consumer health blog focused on the diabetes community. The content is not medically reviewed and doesn't adhere to Healthline's editorial guidelines. For more information about Healthline's partnership with Diabetes Mine, please click here.